So quote Mark Twain. It’s not really an argument.

And one more thing: My stats bolster strong arguments, I believe, unless otherwise proven. If 25% of people killed by police are black, and if I can prove crime stats have a fair amount of accuracy, and show black persons are 28% of arrests (thus, interactions with police), and higher for violent crimes (weapon, aggravated assault, homicide, etc — all over 35%), then how is there racial bias in police shootings?

Plus this guy Roland Fryer did it in a smarter way.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lies,_damned_lies,_and_statistics

“Lies, damned lies, and statistics” is a phrase describing the persuasive power of numbers, particularly the use of statistics to bolster weak arguments. It is also sometimes colloquially used to doubt statistics used to prove an opponent’s point.

The term was popularised in United States by Mark Twain (among others), who attributed it to the British Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli: “There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies, and statistics.” However, the phrase is not found in any of Disraeli’s works and the earliest known appearances were years after his death. Several other people have been listed as originators of the quote, and it is often erroneously attributed to Twain himself.[1]

Writer. Researcher. Designer. Human seeking better outcomes. Also searching for relevant facts and logical arguments above expedient or politial narratives.

Writer. Researcher. Designer. Human seeking better outcomes. Also searching for relevant facts and logical arguments above expedient or politial narratives.